a tantric guide

Slide1a tantric guide is a funny poem about a woman’s introduction to tantric yoga in her pursuit of personal wisdom while living in an urban, middle-class society.

Yoga has been a popular form of exercise in almost every major Western city for decades.  Not only is it great exercise, it helps the body prevent and heal from injury – and some argue, from sickness.  The physical practice also calms the mind and relaxes stress.

Yoga is more than just physical exercise, however, since the physical is enough to cover the above benefits, most of us don’t look further.  In the twenty years that I have practiced yoga, I satisfied myself mainly with just the physical study and a little meditation.

The focus of this poem surrounds my attempt to go a little further out there into tantric yoga — with as open a mind as I could possibly manage.  I started with a book.  I took from it what wisdom I could but had to leave a lot of it behind.

Tantric yoga is a fascinating study that makes the asanas (physical exercises) of yoga seem like child’s play in comparison.  Though there is wisdom in this study, I am glad that I had enough self-awareness to decide what was or was not for me.  I’m also glad that I didn’t close myself completely at the first sign of ‘I ain’t doing that’, for I would have lost the opportunity to find what beauty and wisdom that I did in tantric yoga.  I didn’t forcefully reject anything.  I put aside what wasn’t for me, kept what seemed good for further consideration and continued to the end of the book.

Slide2One needs the courage to be vulnerable to accept life lessons. However, one also needs the self-confidence to know when something is not right for him or her. This may seem difficult if one is trying to learn that self-confidence.  I think your heart will always tell you, regardless, if you listen carefully.  I hope so, anyway.

You know what I think is my saving grace in life lessons?  I never take myself too seriously.  Lessons, I absorb as earnestly as I can but I remind myself that I am an absurd little human and I learn wisdom very slowly and because I am uniquely absurd, somebody else’s mantra is not necessarily my own.

I have wondered if this mindset prevents me from taking the greater wisdom from life lessons.  This has been suggested a few times in my personal and literary studies as much as the opposite.  I do take some things very seriously but this is an exclusive list.  And even then, I think there is room for a little humour.

I hope you enjoy this funny poem despite being a little out there.

© lyw

 

This Rock Wears a Wild Crown

This Rock Wears a Wild Crown is a poem about a funny guy, royally stubborn in loyalty, steadfastness, inappropriate humour and recreational pugilism.  The zen quality of rocks and the flow of time has failed to smooth any part of this demeanour.

Ironically, this poem and character can be a great yet indirect support to overly-sensitive people or anybody stuck in their own heavy moods.  His inappropriate humour and proud opinions dumbfound sensitivity and disrupt both serenity and melancholy.

Despite his roughness, he is friendly.  Despite his offensiveness, he intends no harm. Despite his admiration for the art of war, he is honest – relatively – more honest than you’d expect, anyway.

And despite my persistent confusion over his approach to life, I can’t help but think he is searching for the same things as me – just in a more combative way.  What is that, ultimately?  Love?  God?  Maybe. I’ll only indirectly admit that in poetry.

I’d like to invite you to meet this character in the poem, this rock wears a wild crown; the latest video installment to the lyw channel on Youtube, promoting poets and poetry through online media, as well as a selected poem from the poetry chapbook, ya helu.

written by lyw

Who is Helweh, the Troll?

Slide1‘helweh, the troll’ is a poem about a character who seeks an answer to a question that is thrown upon her: ‘how do you earn a living?’ She is a mythical creature considering the human pursuit of financial security and quality of life. She is a character who finds herself in employment that does not suit her natural talents.

Written with affection and humour for somebody I know, as well as many people who I suspect have a little troll blood in them, she was a former co-worker who I shared many a coffee break and, back in that day, a smoke break. We worked many hours in the same business district and cultivated a strange balance of dedication to our work and finding time for our own personal well-being. She, unfortunately, had a shorter fuse and patience for office culture and never stayed at any job for long.  Funny as hell though and as long as I work downtown, I hope she does, too, even though she would prefer something else.  Office environments need people like her.

This quasi fairy tale / myth was written using the breadcrumb trail of poetry as the vehicle for narration.  The poem is part of the poetry chapbook, ya heluas well as this week’s addition to the lyw channel on Youtube, currently rolling out a poetry campaign making poets and poetry our daily treat and exercise.

When creating Helweh as my hero, I drew inspiration from Joseph Campbell’s book, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, and Dante Alighieri’s epic poem, The Divine Comedy. In this poem, Helweh’s character makes a hapless comparison between her journey and that of Dante’s epic journey through Hell and Purgatory towards Heaven.

Slide2In regards to Joseph Campbell’s, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, many years ago, I found this non-fiction book a compelling read that dissected the role of the hero in human myth and story. As well, this book left me with the hopeful idea that I am, or can be, the hero in my own life’s story – alas, a hope that I have often found disappointed ever since.  Still, it’s a beautiful and passionate book for a work of non-fiction and I don’t regret this aggravated kernel of hope imbedded in my heart. I humour it sometimes and it keeps me humble. At the end of the poem, I left Helweh with a possible answer to her riddle yet it is unknown if or how she will implement it.  If I, or my friend, have not lived up to the call-to-adventure, then perhaps this Helweh lass will.

As an aside, I remember having a cynical thought when I finished reading Campbell’s book, that today’s real world did not look for leadership from heroes or encourage the possibility of living heroes. It is as if the concept is left to fantasy, film and fiction; for those who wear capes and need special powers.

It was a wonderful journey writing this poem. I did not know how it would end or how I would help Helweh answer her question when I first began writing it.  I guess if I wanted to make myself feel better about Joseph Campbell’s book, I could say that I did answer a very subjective call-to-myself in this poem.

Thanks for reading this blog and please visit our latest link and video to the lyw YouTube channel:

written by lyw

Blog Image Sources:

Atlas Obscura Rakotz bridge: http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/rakotzbrucke

Under the Mosswort Bridge: http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/cardart/LRW/Mosswort_Bridge_640.jpg