When the Plug gets Unplugged, a poem by Kim Hyesoon

Photo by Henrik Donnestad, Unsplash.com

War and horror – and everything underlying – happens for a species like ours.  We’ve got a long history of it.  Bad habits die hard they say.  That’s why I say, when you see an expression of the grotesque in art, don’t be so quick to turn the eyes from it.  Not always, of course.  For the kind of art that ONLY wants to be shocking or gross — I’d rather spare my senses.

However, in Kim Hyesoon’s poem, When the Plug gets Unplugged, it’s not her fault if the grotesque is the inevitable result of her subject. I might get squeamish and back away from her imagery but I can still follow an honest, human voice trying to explain and share a painful reality with me.

The poem seems to be about the aftermath of a war, a battle, probably atomic.  But is it that simple?  Could it actually be a metaphor of any kind of traumatic loss or suffering?  An ugliness or hurt that connects all of us whether we’ve been through war or not.

I’ve never experienced war.  I’ve read about it.  Seen documentaries that gave me nightmares.  I stare at a poem like this and just wonder.  Is it really that grotesque?  Or just part of what we all are?  It is a mess.  Should I be surprised?  Given our human history?  That our imperfections can be that vivid?  And can we accept them?  In order to start cleaning up somehow.  She’s asking for a flame thrower or act of God.  Any better ideas?

If art is meant to be an expression of our humanity then it certainly won’t always be beautiful.  If I look closely enough at this poem, put aside the repulsion, I may recognize something of my own ugliness and horror that I am turning away from and refusing to deal with.

The latest poetry video on the lywTube channel is a piece from this poem.  I do invite everyone to check out the full poem on the Missing Slate journal website.

Check out the poetry video at this link:

© lyw 

Ali’s Song: an old call for peace re-Activated

The latest poet to be featured on the lyw Youtube channel is a peace activist.  Michael R. Burch has many other titles but the selected poems that have been translated into lywtube all sound this particular chord.

Ironically, I received the green light from Mr. Burch to illustrate his poems about the same time that PBS ran their Vietnam War documentary series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novak; a series that showed people from all different sides of that war who were so sure they were right at one time and not so sure at the end.  It is a very well-rounded and thorough documentary guaranteed to make me shamefully thankful that I don’t know war and hate to that extreme.

The poems, like this documentary series, do not make me regret taking time for very somber subject matter.  I consider it a privilege.  They remind me that the world is still healing from a past that we inherited.  The poet and the film-makers presented the subjects through intimate, human perspective, like meeting an injured family member who needs me to listen and care for him/her rather than some cold horror being reported on the evening news.

The first poetry video, Ali’s Song, is a poem that depicts Muhammad Ali’s stand against the draft into the Vietnam War and for equality.  The second poetry video, Survivors, is a short yet powerful perspective on the definition of a survivor.  The third, Something, is a poem dedicated to the children of the Holocaust and Nakba.  The first poetry video is loud, rhythmical and strong.  The other two are shorter but slower and quiet.

Ali’s Song … I hesitate to summarize anything about Muhammad Ali or his relationship with his country.  However, that stand he made makes a great ruler to measure oneself by.  Read the story (a version), ask yourself what or who you think was right?  What was wrong?  What would you have done?  He had so many people telling him he was wrong and so many reasons to doubt his decision.  And if he ever did, he didn’t show it.

I hope that I should be so ready to take as strong a stand as he did when an equally important choice is presented to me — and, that I am not wrong in my decisions.  That’s just it, isn’t it?  Yeah, we need more champions today, for sure, but with information being so suspect these days, how do we make sure what we do is right?

Ali’s public image as a heavyweight champion didn’t leave much room for talk about his soul and relationship with God but I think he would have really liked the references in this poem dedicated to him.

The other two poetry videos speak for themselves.  They may be a lot quieter and slower than Ali and Ali’s Song but they are just as strong.

I would like to invite you to please check out these new poetry videos on the lyw channel. The text is best viewed in the highest HD setting in Youtube.

Ali’s Song, a poem by Michael R. Burch:

2. Survivors, a poem by Michael R. Burch:

3. Something, a poem by Michael R. Burch:

© lyw